Informational Legal Graphics

At Complete Trial Graphics, our clients are often faced with the challenge of explaining convoluted scenarios to a jury. As all litigators know, nothing is black and white in the courtroom. It can be difficult or even impossible to convey important details with words alone.

Typically, when providing visual litigation support services, we meet with a litigation team and learn about the complexities and challenges of a case. After reading the court documents and reviewing our notes, our team brainstorms to find the best solutions for each individual case. With decades of experience creating informational trial graphics, we are highly skilled at analyzing a concept and stripping it down to its essential parts to create a demonstrative that is easy for any viewer to understand. Our streamlined graphical presentations work in tandem with the attorney’s arguments to create strong presentations that both the jury and judge can easily relate to. 

Our litigation support services include the following types of informational trial graphics:

  • Key Player Visuals: It is often difficult for the juror to remember who is who. We address this issue by creating easy-to-follow diagrams or organizational flow charts.

  • Explanatory Trial Graphics: In many cases, there is a need to explain exactly how something happened or how something works. In this instance, we create a demonstrative that explains the process in a clear, simple manner.

  • Before-and-After Demonstratives: Cases often carry a theme about the way something or someone was “before“—and how an incident or incidents changed the situation. For such cases, we create slides comparing the before and after scenarios.

  • Charts and Graphs: The majority of cases contain charts and graphs. Whether your case involves oil and gas, a patent dispute or a high-dollar divorce, we create visuals based on the relevant facts so that the attorney’s point is always clear. We also work with experts and assist them in reformatting charts for maximum impact.

  • Comparisons: Similar to before-and-after demonstratives, sometimes you need to compare evidence. For example, the attorney may need to show the opponents proposed damages compared to their damage model or how something happened compared to how it should have happened.